EPA Releases Explanation of Significant Difference Report for the Brunswick Wood Preserving Site

EPA Releases Explanation of Significant Difference Report for the  Brunswick Wood Preserving Site

Site: Brunswick Wood Preserving

Author: Constance Riggins

Submitted: February 17, 2016

Visits: 326

Tags: Soil, groundwater


 

EPA Releases the Explanation of Significant Difference Report for the Brunswick Wood Preserving Site - January 2016

 

The cleanup plan for the Brunswick Wood Preserving Site changed when EPA sampling in 2013 and 2014 found that creosote still remains in the ground outside the Western Containment Area. The Western Containment Area has two barrier walls to try and contain the creosote, the first one was built in 2009 and the second one was built in 2011. This new cleanup plan addresses creosote in shallow soil, not creosote deeper than 25 feet.

 

From 1958 to 1991, the Brunswick Wood Preserving Site housed wood treatment and preserving operations which contaminated the groundwater and soil. The site requires long term cleanup due to regular use of chemicals such as creosote, pentachlorophenol, and copper chromium arsenate, which contaminated the groundwater and soil.

 

Other chemicals of concern include dense nonaqueous phase liquids and sediment chemicals such as naphthalene, benzene, and semivolatile organic compounds. The cleanup is managed in two parts, 1) the Upland, or site wide soils, sediments, and groundwater and 2) the ecological risks in Burnett Creek and other surface waters.

 

The Glynn Environmental Coalition and its technical advisor say, the technologies used to contain the contaminants are supposed keep them from moving sideways but may not keep them from moving downward deeper into the soil. Creating barrier walls has already been unsuccessful at containing the creosote at the site.

Read the full report: http://www.glynnenvironmental.org/images/stories/pdf/BWP-TAR1-29-16.pdf